Langues en voie de disparition/ Endangered Languages

(version anglaise plus bas/English version below)

640px-Nama_man_giving_us_a_lesson_in_the_click_language_(3694165852)

le français, mon ange,

les diablesses des mornes commencent à m’apeller

en lançant mon nom secret

au-dessus de toute l’étendue du bleu

jusqu’aux côtes dans mes yeux

les plus abandonnés de la planète.

 

le français, ma langue

jadis préférée,

les diablesses des grottes te font changer

de direction, en suivant les parfums titillants

d’un chocolat qui ne connaît pas de sucre,

d’un monstre des forêts qui ne se sait pas monstre

d’un écho libérée, bondissant de rocher en rocher

criant enchanté

sans qu’une seule oreille

soit là pour l’entendre et confirmer

le son avant qu’il ne s’accroche longuement

chez les clins d’œil et qu’il ne s’endorme.

640px-Mural_Països_Catalans

Note: ce poème tire de l’inspiration du roman Texaco de Patrick Chamoiseau ainsi que de l’heure actuelle où je me sens aveugle à la disparition des diverses langues du monde et donc, de la pensée facilitée par la connaissance d’une langue différente, une connaissance dont la disparition entrainera une réduction des pensées possibles aux humains vivants sans que l’on prenne l’action d’apprendre les langues rares de tout recoin du monde.

Manuscript_from_Nepal_in_Newari_and_Sanskrit

English Version

french, my angel,

the mountain devils begin to call me

throwing my secret name

over and across the entire blue

up to the coasts in my eyes

the most remote on the planet.

 

french, my language

formerly favorite,

the devils of the valleys make you change

direction, following the titillating scents

of a chocolate that knows no sugar

of a forest monster that knows no monster in itself

of a liberated echo, bounding from rock to rock

calling enchanted

without a single ear

present to hear and to confirm

the sound before it spreads its lanky body out

alongside the blinks of the eye, and falls to sleep.

Note: This poem is inspired by the book Texaco by Patrick Chamoiseau, as well as by the present day, in which I feel blind to the disappearance of the world’s diverse languages and thus, to the ways of thinking facilitated by knowing each different language, a knowledge whose disappearance will lead to a reduction of the number of possible thoughts for living humans unless we take action to learn the rare languages of every nook and cranny of the earth.

444px-Fish125

Images:

“Nama man giving us a lesson in the click language.” [see also Khoisan languages wikipedia] By Greg Willis from Denver, CO, usa – CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24311828

“Mural a Argentona, El Maresme, Catalunya.” By No machine-readable author provided. 1997 assumed (based on copyright claims). – No machine-readable source provided. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=984336

“This manuscript from Nepal, in Newari and Sanskrit, dating from around 1900, contains a number of miscellaneous prayers and spells with illustrations on a long strip of stiff paper folded into a compact book. In addition to being a basis for the writing and painting, the yellow background may also be an insect repellent containing arsenic. Represented here are deities of the planets, who are propitiated to prevent the bad things their position in a horoscorpe may threaten. In the Indian system, there are nine planets, the seven visible ones plus the two “nodes” of the moon. Lunar and solar eclipses occur at the points of the moon’s orbit. (Text by Library of Congress at the URL stated [below]).” By Unknown – Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., USA (Southern Asian Collection, Asian Division) at http://www.loc.gov/rr/asian/guide/guide-homer.html. Public Domain.

“Ink and pencil on paper copy of a damaged fish drawing originally on an ancient astrology book from Beyyage Beyya, Funaadu. Fua Mulaku, Maldives. Reconstructed section is in pencil.” By Xavier Romero-Frias – Own work, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9704460

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